Guy Kawasaki’s 10/20/30 Rule

December 17, 2009

The Art of Pitching:  When pitching your venture to possible investors, one must always remember the 10/20/30 rule…

1.  10 Slides in Your Presentation

2. 20 Minutes

3.  30 Point Font

If you keep it short, there is a better chance your prospects will retain some of the information you are giving. Most meetings are around an hour, thus you want to keep your presentation short so there is plenty of time for discussion. The discussion is what truly makes or breaks your deal. Finally, 30 point font is absolutely necessary because the people you are pitching to are probably older with weaker vision.  Kawasaki also states, “A good rule of thumb for font size is to divide the oldest investor’s age by two, and use that font.”

These are simple things to remember about your pitch and things I have struggled to remember.  My biggest issue is that no one cares what I have to say, they just want to know the facts and figures and then I can keep my mouth shut.  I would look more professional and reliable in a businessman’s eye if I spent most of my presentation listening to what the investors have to say. I think the hardest thing to understand – yet the most important – is that even though you want to go into detail and explain, explain, explain, you truly just need to shut up and listen to what everyone else is saying.

Here is the problem, I was born to be frustrated when people do not understand what I am talking about. I was born with the problem that I cannot stand listening to stupid people talk. I do not have the ability to sit in a room with people and not share my opinion. With these being said, I feel as if I could never get a startup funded.

It is easy for me to only have 10 slides and 30 point font, but 20 minutes to convince investors to back my company? That will be tough.

My next step is to find a politeness to professionalism course.

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